Re-evaluate co-parenting plans during the summer

Even the most comprehensive co-parenting plans may need some alterations when children are on summer vacation.

As children are now on summer vacation, parents who are considering a divorce and those with established co-parenting plans may discover some challenges as the weather warms. When the children are in school, many families adapt to a specific schedule, with a particular parent responsible for getting the children from school on specific days of the week.

During the summer, however, the set schedule necessitated by a busy school year filled with extracurricular activities is no longer required, and often is difficult to maintain.

Therefore, it is a good idea for divorced parents to reevaluate their parenting plan during the summer to anticipate any hurdles they might encounter along the way.

Schedules with more flexibility

During the summer, children are likely to have much more flexibility in their schedule, as they are no longer in school during set times each day. Consequently, parents who share physical custody of the children may choose to adjust their parenting time schedule.

Such alterations to the schedule mean former spouses need to determine a method of communication that works for them. While some exes are able to put aside their differences and have civil conversations regarding the kids in person or on the phone, others may find limiting their conversations to writing whenever possible is more effective.

Planning for a summer vacation without your ex

Parents are also likely to wish to travel with their children during their summer vacation. While some former spouses are able and willing to travel together, it is more common for one parent to take the children on a vacation alone.

When planning a vacation, it is wise to discuss your plans with your former spouse as soon as you have the details available. Tell your spouse where you plan to go and the dates when you will be gone. If the vacation overlaps with time your spouse would usually have with the children, discuss potential changes to the schedule to allow your former spouse extra time with the kids.

When on vacation, remember that your children may have times when they miss their other parent, particularly if they are missing time with your ex while on the trip. Respect your children's feelings and understand that while vacations are fun, the change in routine may place some added stress on your kids.

If you have been thinking about getting a divorce, take the time to consider the best methods for helping your children make the transition. In addition, it is a good idea to entrust the details of the legal dissolution to an experienced family law attorney. A legal professional will ensure your interests are protected.

Keywords: summer, children, divorce, co-parenting