Should I Depose My Spouse in Our Divorce Action?

This Week’s Blog by Carole T. Orland

In all divorces cases in Connecticut a party has the right to depose his or her spouse pursuant to C.G.S.Sections 52-148a-152 and Connecticut Practice Book Sections 13-26. 13-331. A Deposition is a proceeding whereby the deponent is questioned and provides testimony under oath. It typically occurs in the office of the lawyer representing the party who is taking the Deposition. The spouse is either subpoenaed (served by a marshal) to appear or appears pursuant to a Notice of Deposition served on the spouse’s attorney. Most often, attached to the subpoena or the Notice is a schedule with document requests. These requests may include documents relating to a broad swath of items that relate to finances, custody and/or any issues in the case.

Some of these documents may have been produced prior to the Deposition and need not be produced again, except for updates if applicable. If the requests seek documents that are objectionable, for example if they are too broad or are harassing, the deponent’s lawyer can object and may file a Motion for Protective Order seeking protection from “annoyance, embarrassment, oppression or undue burden or expense.” Connecticut Practice Book Section 13-5. The Court will then decide what must be produced or not.

For all practical purposes the deposing attorney can ask almost any question that is tangentially related to the case and the deponent must answer unless he or she asserts a privilege such as attorney/client, therapist/patient or self-incrimination, or if the question is merely intended to harass the deponent.

There is no proscribed time for the length of a Deposition. Rarely is it less than a couple of hours but it may go on for several days, consecutively or over time, depending on the complexity of the case. The deposing party is entitled to be present but is not required to be there.

So the question arises, “Should I depose my spouse?” It is a decision that must be discussed thoroughly with your lawyer and experienced lawyers in Westport and Greenwich can assist you in making a strategic decision. Reasons for deposing your spouse may include: the efficiency of obtaining testimony under oath; the need to get documents and have them explained; the benefit of locking in testimony that can be used at trial; the opportunity for counsel to get a feel for the deponent’s veracity and demeanor; and providing the deponent with a reality check of the examination and scrutiny he or she will undergo at trial. However, there may be situations where you will not need to or want to depose your spouse, for example if he or she: has been forthright and attentive about supplying information and documents; no further explanations are required with regard to the documents; there is no suspicion of untrustworthy behavior; and you and your spouse are on amicable terms. Cost is also a factor to think about, as Depositions are time consuming and costly. You should also consider that taking your spouse’s Deposition can be an emotional event for both of you and can increase hostilities, which may then negatively affect future negotiations and settlement.

Our lawyers at Broder & Orland LLC have vast experience with Depositions and can effectively help you weigh the options and guide you to the correct decision when it comes to deposing your spouse.