Tag: family law

What is Short Calendar?

This Week’s Blog by Nicole M. DiGiose.

What is the Short Calendar?

The Short Calendar is a mechanism for pending motions to be heard.  Once a motion has been filed in a case, it will appear on the Short Calendar.  Short Calendar occurs on a specific day each week, which will depend on the Judicial District in which your case has been filed, for example, Mondays in Stamford and Thursdays in Bridgeport.

 How Long does it Take for a Motion to Appear on the Short Calendar?

 Once a motion has been filed, it takes approximately two to three weeks to appear on the Short Calendar.

I Would like to Proceed with my Motion on Short Calendar – What Happens Next?

 The Short Calendar list becomes available approximately one to two weeks prior to the actual Short Calendar date.  Once the Short Calendar List becomes available, there is a period of time during which the available motions to be heard can be marked either “ready” or “off.”  In order to proceed with a motion at the Short Calendar, it must be marked “ready” during the marking period.  Once a motion has been marked “ready,” notice must then be sent to the other side.

 I am Unavailable or Unable to Proceed with my Motion on Short Calendar – What Happens Next?

 If you are unavailable or unable to proceed with your motion when it appears on the Short Calendar list, do not worry—motions may be reclaimed.  Reclaiming a motion will bring it back up to the next available Short Calendar.  Typically, motions may be reclaimed for a period of ninety days from their original file date before they are considered stale.

 What Happens at Short Calendar?

 When you first arrive at Short Calendar, your attorney will fill out a Memo to the Clerk.  This Memo indicates the status of the matter, such as: (a) whether you are requesting a continuance, (b) whether you have an agreement, or (c) whether you will need to proceed with a hearing.  Short Calendar days are usually the busiest days in the Courthouse and there will likely be some downtime while you are waiting to attend Family Relations or to have a hearing.

What is Family Relations?

 Family Relations is a free service offered by the Judicial Branch to assist the Court and parties in resolving disputes.  Prior to a contested matter being heard, the Judge will order counsel and the parties to attend Family Relations in order to attempt to resolve the dispute.  Meeting with Family Relations is generally mandatory.

 What Happens if Family Relations is Unsuccessful?

 Absent an agreement at Family Relations or otherwise, a Judge will need to conduct a full evidentiary hearing, after which he or she will render a decision, which could take up to one hundred and twenty days.

Will my Motion be Reached at Short Calendar?  What Happens if it is not Reached?

Short Calendar is reserved for “short” matters, typically those that will take about an hour or less.  If your matter is expected to take more than one hour, a judge will likely request that a date certain is obtained.  A date certain is a non-Short Calendar day on which the motion will be heard.

At Broder & Orland LLC, we attend Short Calendar throughout Connecticut, including Stamford, Bridgeport, Danbury, New Haven, and Hartford.  Our skilled attorneys will ensure that you are adequately prepared for when your motion appears on the Short Calendar.

What are the Top Five Mistakes to Avoid in a Connecticut Divorce?

This Week’s Blog by Jaime S. Dursht

What are the Top Five Mistakes to Avoid in a Connecticut Divorce?

The divorce process is fraught with emotion which can lead to making mistakes with long-term effects.  Each divorce is different, however, here are some common mistakes we divorce attorneys see.

Is it a Disadvantage not to Understand Your Financial Situation?

Yes.  It is important at the outset of the divorce process to have an understanding of your personal and household expenses, liabilities, income and what assets there are to divide.  This will help in setting reasonable expectations as to the outcome and will help in planning for financial security moving forward, which is the ultimate goal.  Take the time to gather information, review your bank and credit card statements, and if you are not financially literate, take steps to educate yourself with the basics.

Is it Better to Settle Early in the Process?

Not necessarily.   Divorce is a highly emotional time, and it is easy to become overwhelmed by acrimony and the desire to give in just to end the emotional trauma.  This could be a costly mistake, however, because depending on the assets involved, it may be well worth taking the time to discover and fully vet out the values of business interests, trusts, stock options and pension benefits which you may be entitled to share.

Is it Worth Arguing the Details?

Often the expense of the argument can exceed the value of what it is you are trying to achieve in the first place.  Try not to get caught up in minor wins and losses of the negotiation process when it comes to the smaller details of, for instance, the method of payment of co-pays at the pediatrician’s office or the percentage point split of reimbursement for extracurricular activities.   It may feel like an emotional triumph in the short term, but may not be worth the expense in the overall cost of the divorce.

Should I Seek the Advice of Family and Friends?

It is not a good idea to rely on the advice of family and friends regarding your own divorce however well-meaning it is intended to be.  Just because your friend got the house and lump sum alimony in her divorce does not mean that you will or even should.  Every divorce is different, and one person’s experience does not readily translate into another’s.

Is it Better to Act First and Ask Later?

No.  It is always better to check with your attorney before taking action, especially if you are in an angry or depressed frame of mind.  Acting on impulse, for example cutting your spouse off from credit card use or denying access to marital funds to limit spending, can have adverse legal consequences.  Not only do these particular actions risk a contempt finding by a court, but may end up costing you more just to rectify it in the end.

The attorneys at Broder & Orland LLC with offices in Westport and Greenwich, practice solely in matrimonial and family law, and have significant experience in counseling and developing an appropriate strategy to optimize the desired financial result.

Three Critical Issues to Address in a Prenuptial Agreement

This Week’s Blog by Andrew M. Eliot

A prenuptial agreement is a written contract entered into by two people before they are married. Its purpose is to resolve, in advance, various financial matters that will necessarily arise from the marriage in the event of divorce or death of a spouse.  Notably, prenuptial agreements offer parties on opportunity to resolve financial issues in whatever manner they choose, rather than leaving such issues to be determined by the divorce laws of a particular state.  While the contents of prenuptial agreements can vary widely, there are certain issues that are commonly addressed in such agreements, three of which are discussed herein.

Property Distribution and Asset Classification: 

Prenuptial agreements typically define which types of assets will be subject to division in the event of divorce (i.e., which assets will constitute “Marital Property”), and which types of assets will necessarily be retained by one party to the exclusion of the other (i.e., which assets will constitute “Separate Property.”)  While there are many ways to classify assets, it is common for agreements to state that any assets brought into the marriage by a particular party shall constitute that person’s Separate Property, while any assets acquired during the marriage shall constitute Marital Property.  It also common for prenuptial agreements to provide that inheritances received by a party during the marriage shall constitute that person’s Separate Property.  In addition to classifying assets as Marital or Separate Property, many prenuptial agreements expressly set forth the manner in which Marital Property will be divided between the parties in the event of divorce.  For example, Marital Property might be divided equally, “equitably” (as determined at a later time under the laws of a particular state), or in some percentage allocation other than 50/50.

Many prenuptial agreements also address the disposition of assets that are acquired during the marriage with a combination of each party’s Separate Property and/or Marital Property, often referred to as “Mixed Property.”  Often prenuptial agreements will be drafted to ensure that both parties will recoup any Separate Property contributions he or she made to the acquisition of Mixed Property.

Alimony

Generally speaking, there are three options when it comes to addressing alimony in a prenuptial agreement.  One option is for the parties to agree to mutual “alimony waivers,” meaning that each party agrees that he or she will have no right to seek alimony from the other in the event of a divorce.  A second option is for each party to retain the right to seek alimony from the other, while leaving the issue open for determination at the time of divorce.  A third option is for parties to expressly agree upon specific alimony obligations that one party shall have to the other in the event of divorce, which may could include specific provisions regarding the duration and/or the amount of such alimony.

Estate Rights

In most jurisdictions, absent a written agreement to the contrary, each party to a marriage will be guaranteed by law to receive a certain minimum share of his or her spouse’s estate (the “elective share”) upon their spouse’s death.  For example, the “elective share” in Connecticut is comprised of the lifetime use of one-third of the value of all real and personal property owned by a party at the time of his or her death, after the payment of all debts and charges against that party’s estate.  However, a spouse’s right to an “elective share” can be waived in a prenuptial agreement, and it is not uncommon to see estate rights waivers in prenuptial agreements particularly where one or both parties have children from a prior relationship.

At Broder & Orland LLC we have extensive experience throughout Fairfield County and Connecticut negotiating and drafting prenuptial agreements that align with our clients’ circumstances.

 

What is the Middletown Regional Family Trial Docket?

This Week’s Blog by Chris DeMattie

The Connecticut Judicial Branch created a special docket in the Middlesex Judicial District to handle contested custody and visitation matters.  One judge presides over and manages the docket and per the Judicial Branch: “The goal is to handle contested cases involving children quickly and without interruption.” Cases are referred to the Regional Family Trial Docket by the presiding family judge in the local court if the referred case meets the program criteria: (a) child focused issue; (b) ready for trial; (c) family relations case study completed and not more than nine months old; and  (d) an attorney has been appointed for the children.

How does my Case end up in the Middletown Regional Family Trial Docket?

Since our local family courts are overcrowded and its resources are limited, it is difficult for the Court to devote significant time to just one case.  Thus, if you and your spouse are unable to resolve the children and financial issues in your case, you meet the foregoing program criteria, and if your case will likely take more than four (4) days of trial, it will likely to be referred to the Middletown Regional Family Trial Docket.  Recently, non-custody cases have also been referred to the Middletown Regional Family Trial Docket, if the presiding judge determines there is a compelling reason to do so, such complex financial issues which would require substantial court time.

How is the Middletown Regional Family Trial Docket similar to my local court?

The Middletown Regional Family Trial Docket applies the same law and procedures as your local court (e.g. Stamford, Bridgeport, New Haven).

The standing Trial Management Orders still apply.

If your case is eligible for e-filing, all pleadings, motions, and notices are filed the same way.  If your case is not eligible for e-filing, all filings are sent to both your local court and the Middletown Clerk.

The Courthouse opens at 9:00 a.m. and closes at 5:00 p.m.  There is typically a fifteen-minute mid morning and afternoon recess, as well as a lunch break from 1:00 p.m. to 2:00 p.m.

How is the Middletown Regional Family Trial Docket different from my local court?

First, you are assigned one Judge, and this Judge follows your case the entire time.  At your local court, generally you can be assigned a new Judge each court date, and you often do not know which Judge is assigned to your case until you appear at Court.

Second, except for rare circumstances, pendente lite motions are not heard until the time of trial.  At your local court, pendente lite motions are often heard while the case is pending and prior to trial.

Third, the timing of proceeding is much different.  At the Middletown Regional Family Trial Docket, since you case is assigned to one Judge, you are often the only matter scheduled on your court date.  This means that your case will often be called right at 9:30 a.m. and you will generally continue uninterrupted until approximately 4:45 p.m.  At your local court, it is rare for your case to be the only matter scheduled on your court date.  Unfortunately, too often there are multiple matters scheduled for the same date with the same Judge, and your case may not be heard.  Further, since your local court is not a special docket, there are usually multiple other matters scheduled such as status conferences, report backs, or stipulations.  Even though those matters are generally short, they still disrupt your proceeding because the Judge will delay and/or stop your hearing to address those matters.

In other words, it is rare to be interrupted at the Middletown Regional Family Trial Docket, while it is expected at your local court.

Broder & Orland LLC, with offices in Westport and Greenwich, CT, concentrates specifically in the areas of family law, matrimonial law and divorce.  As experienced divorce trial lawyers we have successfully tired many cases at the Middletown Regional Family Trial Docket.

Can I Appeal My Connecticut Family Law Case?

This Week’s Blog by Sarah E. Murray

The Judge Issued a Decision in My Connecticut Family Law Case: Can I Appeal?

In Connecticut, you have the right to appeal a final judgment entered by a trial court.  Common final judgments subject to appeal in family law cases are final judgments from orders dissolving the marriage, including permanent orders regarding alimony, child support, and custody, and orders regarding the division of assets.  Post-judgment decisions, such as those regarding the modification of alimony, child support, and custody, are also appealable.

When Must I File My Appeal?

The deadline for filing an appeal is no later than twenty days after the court issues notice of its decision.  It is not advisable to wait until the last day to appeal, as missing the deadline, even inadvertently, can be fatal to your appeal.  Therefore, you should seek the advice of an appellate practitioner who does family law appellate work immediately after receiving a decision from the trial court.

My Ex-Spouse is Filing an Appeal: Do I Need to Do Anything?

If you are not the person appealing the decision, you need to ensure that your rights are protected during the pendency of the appeal.  You should consult with an appellate lawyer in order to understand the basis for your former spouse’s appeal, any potential weaknesses in the judge’s decision that make the decision vulnerable to being overturned on appeal, and what your best arguments in defense are.

In What Court is an Appeal Decided?

Most appeals are heard by the Connecticut Appellate Court.  Rarely, a case will be reviewed by the Connecticut Supreme Court without being heard first by the Appellate Court.  Direct review of a trial court decision by the Connecticut Supreme Court can sometimes occur when there is an issue that has never been decided by Connecticut Appellate Court or the Connecticut Supreme Court, when there is conflicting law on a particular subject matter, or when there is a matter of public importance worthy of decision by the Connecticut Supreme Court.

Will the Appeal be Similar to the Trial?

The appellate process is very different from the trial process.  There is no new evidence or new testimony at the Appellate Court.  Each party submits thorough briefs outlining the facts of the case and the legal arguments in support of his or her positions.  The briefs are based on the record, consisting of the testimony from the trial court proceedings and any exhibits submitted to the trial court.  The appellant, i.e., the person taking the appeal, submits his or her brief first.  After the appellee submits his or her brief, the appellant has the opportunity to file a Reply Brief.  After all of the briefs are submitted, the Appellate Court will schedule a date for oral argument before a panel of Appellate judges.  At the Appellate Court, the panel typically consists of three judges.  At the Supreme Court, the panel consists of seven justices.   A party may attend oral argument, but is not required to do so.  After oral argument, the Appellate Court (or Supreme Court, as the case may be) will issue its Decision in writing.  The Decision is usually released several months after oral argument takes place.

How Long Will My Connecticut Appeal Take?

The appellate process in Connecticut can take several months, at least.  Some appeals can last over one year.

Can My Case Be Settled While an Appeal is Pending?

Your case can be settled at any time before the appeal is decided by the Appellate Court. Experienced litigators will explore potential avenues for settlement, if possible, in order to avoid the expense and time of an appeal.  In most family law cases, the Appellate Court will schedule the case for a Preargument Conference prior to briefs being due.  The Preargument Conference is a confidential settlement opportunity that takes place with an experienced judge who will meet with counsel for both parties and attempt to help the parties reach a settlement.  Whether you and your ex-spouse reach a settlement through the Preargument Conference or on your own, you can prepare a settlement agreement and the appeal can be withdrawn once the settlement is approved by the trial court.

Broder & Orland LLC provides appellate representation in addition to litigating at the trial court level.  If you are contemplating an appeal, contact Sarah E. Murray, Esq., Chair of the firm’s Center for Family Law Appeals.

Imputing Income for Child Support Purposes

This Week’s Blog by Andy M. Eliot

How is Child Support Generally Determined in Connecticut?

In Connecticut, the amount of a non-custodial parent’s child support obligation to a custodial parent is directly tied to the respective incomes of both parents. Pursuant to the Connecticut Child Support Guidelines, parents’ respective incomes are plugged into a mathematical formula which yields a presumptively correct weekly child support obligation that one parent must pay to the other.

What Does Voluntary “Underemployment” Mean?

Voluntary underemployment occurs when a parent (whether it be the child support obligor or the parent receiving child support) voluntarily earns less income then he or she is capable of earning based upon his or her education, training and past earnings.  Consider, for example, a scenario in which a child support obligor voluntarily leaves a high-paying job on Wall Street shortly before a child support award will issue to pursue a far less lucrative career as a musician; this would be an example of “voluntary underemployment.”

Do Courts Have Any Means to Redress Voluntary Underemployment in Issuing Child Support Awards?

Yes.  In such circumstances, courts have the discretion to attribute or “impute” income to a parent (whether it be the parent paying child support, the parent receiving child support, or both) for purposes of determining child support obligations.  In other words, when plugging a parent’s income into the mathematical child support formula set forth in the Connecticut Child Support Guidelines, courts may utilize an income figure that reflects the amount of income that a parent could potentially be earning (commonly referred to as “earning capacity”), rather than the amount the parent is actually earning at the time.

How do Courts Determine what Amount of Income to Impute to a Party?

In determining a party’s earning capacity for purposes of imputing income to that party, there is not a precise methodology that Courts employ.  Rather, in any given case, the determining Court will examine the unique set of facts in that particular matter in order to make a determination.  However, factors that Courts typically would consider in this context would include the relevant party’s historical earnings, employment history, vocational skills, employability, age and health.

Are Experts Ever Used to Determine Earning Capacity?

Yes.  In cases where earning capacity is an issue, it is common for either or both parties to hire vocational experts for the purpose of proving (or disproving) the other parent’s earning capacity. A vocational expert will generally testify about what a person with similar experience and expertise should make.

Cases involving earning capacity claims are complex and, in order to be handled properly, require a great deal of attention and expertise.  At Broder & Orland LLC, we have extensive experience handling matters where earning capacity is at issue and have a well-established track record of achieving favorable results for our clients in such matters.

How to Catch a Cheater

This Week’s Blog by Christopher J. DeMattie

As technology rapidly advances, more and more of our daily activities are uploaded to our many electronic devices.  Information is becoming more permanent, and the electronic trail left behind is growing.  It is extremely difficult to keep an electronic secret, so if your spouse is cheating on you there is a good chance you will be able find out from his or her electronic devices.  In the recent past, the first places to look would be phone logs, text messages, and e-mails, but there are many more clever places to look.

What are the Best Apps to Catch a Cheating Spouse?

iPhone Notes – Most people use this application to take notes or set reminders.  However, did you know you can share your notes with another person?  When you share your notes with another person, each enabled user can edit and view the specific notes page.  So instead of sending text messages or e-mails, a cheating spouse can communicate with his or her paramour through the notes app without leaving an electronic transmission trail such as a text message or e-mail.

Screen Time – This new feature for the iPhone tracks how much time a user spends on his or her iPhone each day.  The data is further broken-down by minutes spent on each app, messages transmitted, and phone calls.  So if your spouse is spending more time than usual text messaging or if he or she is spending time using a new app, especially a new messaging app (WeChat, WhatsApp, Slack, or Messenger) it may be an indication he or she is hiding something.

Uber – Unlike texts and e-mails, absent completely deleting the Uber app, there is no way to delete the trip history.  So by accessing the Uber app you can see your spouse’s entire ride history.

Vault / KeepSafe – Vault (iPhone) and KeepSafe (Android) are apps that let you store electronic data, including photos and videos, in a password protected folder on your phone or tablet.

iCloud – Is accessed by inputting an Apple ID and password.  Per Apple, iCloud backups include nearly all data and settings stored on the device. iCloud backups do not include data stored in other cloud services, like Gmail.

Google Maps – If you access Google Maps and select “Your Timeline” you can all of the places the user has visited on any given date and time.  Like the Uber app, reviewing the “Your Timeline” can be very instructive on reconstructing a person’s day.

How do I Legally View my Spouse’s Electronic Devices?

The first step is generally to serve a Request for Production of Documents or Request for Inspection of an Electronic Device.  By making the Request, you put your spouse on notice as to the materials you are requesting to review and/or inspect.  Your spouse then has an obligation to produce the requested materials, which could include a forensic or mirrored copied of his or her iPhone, laptop, or tablet.  However, your spouse could assert various objections to the Request(s), and absent an agreement, the Court will determine the scope of discovery.

In addition, you may serve on your spouse and his or her cell phone provider, a “Litigation Hold Notice,” directing each to preserve several categories of electronically stored information including text messages.  Generally, cell phone providers only retain the content of text messages for three to five days depending on the provider, so it is unlikely you will be able to subpoena the content of your spouse’s past text messages.  However, if a “Litigation Hold Notice” has been served, it is likely the content, time, and location of the text message will be discovered.

Before engaging in any electronic surveillance, be advised that there are many federal and state laws related to stored electronic communications.   It is advisable to consult with an attorney to verify that you do not engage in any unlawful activities related to your spouse’s electronically stored information.

Broder & Orland LLC, with offices in Westport and Greenwich, CT, concentrates specifically in the areas of family law, matrimonial law and divorce.  As experienced divorce trial lawyers we can advise you how to legally obtain your spouse’s electronically stored information or how to protect your own.

What Should I Expect at my Initial Divorce Consultation in Connecticut?

This Week’s Blog by Sarah E. Murray

What is the Purpose of the Initial Divorce Consultation?

After having made the difficult decision to contact an attorney regarding divorce and after making an appointment to meet with him or her, it is natural to feel apprehensive or to be unsure of what to expect at that initial meeting.  Most Fairfield County divorce clients have many questions about the divorce process, possible outcomes, and how Connecticut law applies to his or her case.  Those are all appropriate issues to be discussed in an initial consultation.  One of the primary purposes of the initial divorce consultation, in addition to information gathering, is for the potential client and the potential lawyer to meet in order to determine whether both the client and the lawyer are comfortable working together.  As a client, it is important to feel that you can trust your divorce attorney and that there is good communication between you and your divorce attorney.  The initial consultation is a good opportunity for both the lawyer and client to assess whether they can have a good working relationship during a sometimes difficult process.  

What Do I Need to Bring with Me to My First Meeting with a Potential Divorce Lawyer?

Among other things, it is important for a divorce attorney to have as much information as possible so that he or she can accurately evaluate the case and give the appropriate advice.  Of course, if you were the person served with divorce papers, you should bring those papers to the initial consult so that the attorney can review them and explain them to you.  At the first meeting with a divorce lawyer, however, it is not required that you bring any other documents with you.  The divorce attorney will listen to you and ask questions in order to gain a better understanding of the basic facts of the case.  There will be plenty of time after the initial consultation for you to provide relevant documentation to your lawyer.  While you do not need to bring documents with you to the initial consult, there are some documents that you can bring to make the meeting more productive.  For example, if there is a Prenuptial or Postnuptial Agreement in your case, you should bring a copy of that to the meeting.  Most top Fairfield County divorce attorneys will even ask to see the document in advance of the meeting so that he or she can review it beforehand.  Some people also like to bring relevant financial documentation to the meeting, such as tax returns and bank and brokerage accounts, so that specific financial questions they have can be addressed.

Is What I Discuss at My Initial Divorce Consultation Confidential?

The short answer to this question is: yes.  The information you provide to a potential divorce lawyer, even if you do not hire that person, is kept confidential.  Keep in mind, however, the caveat discussed below.

Should I Bring My Friend (or Family Member) to the Initial Consultation Meeting?

It is normal for people to want emotional support at an initial divorce consultation.  If a third party is present in a meeting between a potential client and a lawyer, that presence can jeopardize the confidentiality of the meeting, as confidentiality and attorney-client privilege typically only extend to the potential client.  If you deem it critical to bring a friend or family member with you to the initial consultation, you can discuss how to handle it with the potential divorce lawyer with whom you are meeting.  You and the divorce attorney may decide to have the friend or family member wait in the reception area during all or part of the meeting in order to protect the information discussed.

What are the General Topics Discussed during the Initial Consult?

In general terms, the best initial consultations cover the following topics, as applicable to the facts of your case: the divorce process in Connecticut, custody of minor children and parenting plans, discovery of relevant information during the divorce, division of assets and liabilities, and alimony and child support.  Top Fairfield County attorneys will also discuss with you strategy concerns and any other issues that may be particular to your case.  In order for the divorce lawyer to give you good advice, he or she will ask many questions, ranging from basic to very personal.  The more information you provide, the more you and a potential divorce attorney can begin crafting a timeline and strategy for your case.

What Questions Should I Ask at the Initial Divorce Consultation?

There is no question too insignificant for an initial divorce consult.  A good divorce attorney will want you to feel comfortable that your questions have been answered and will welcome any and all questions that you have.  There is very little that experienced divorce attorneys have not heard or been asked; so, do not be shy about sharing information or asking questions.  Beyond the typical questions about the divorce process, how long divorces in Connecticut typically last, and what to expect with respect to parenting and finances, you should also ask questions about the financial relationship between you and the potential lawyer.  You will want to know the attorney’s hourly rate, requested retainer or other fee arrangements, and how frequently you will receive invoices reflecting time spent on your case.    

At Broder & Orland LLC, we pride ourselves on our informative initial consultations, which typically initiate an effective attorney-client relationship that lasts throughout the case.  We strive to advise potential clients in a forthright manner so that they feel comfortable about what to expect from the divorce process in Connecticut and so that they understand their options moving forward.

Can I Date While Going Through My Divorce?

This Week’s Blog by Eric J. Broder

Is a Person Allowed to Date While Going through a Divorce?

Yes. There is no restriction against dating. In fact, it can often relieve the daily stress of the divorce process. However, as explained below, there are some important things to keep in mind if you decide to date while going through your divorce.

Can I buy Gifts for My Girlfriend/Boyfriend during my Divorce?

If a party purchases gifts for a girlfriend or boyfriend during the divorce process in the state of Connecticut, the Court could consider the expenditure(s) a dissipation of marital assets and allow the other party to receive a credit for such expenditure(s) at the time of dissolution.

Can I Introduce My Girlfriend/Boyfriend to my Children During the Divorce?

While there is no absolute restriction in Connecticut against doing so, it is highly advisable that a party does not take this step unless and until there is consent from the other party and/or it is done with the assistance of a therapist. Sharing this information with a 5-year-old is obviously different than sharing it with a 10-year-old or even a 15-year-old. Accordingly, we strongly suggest that you receive the proper advice before introducing your girlfriend/boyfriend to your children during a divorce.

Can I Remarry After my Divorce? If so, how soon Thereafter?

Yes, this is actually a more common question than people realize.  You may do so the next day.

Should I Wait to Date Until my Divorce is Final?

This is entirely an individual question and one must determine if he/she is emotionally ready. One reason to avoid dating is because if your spouse finds out, it may cause jealousy. This jealousy may manifest itself in a more aggressive and litigious approach, which may make it more difficult in trying to reach a resolution.

Do I Want my Spouse to Date During the Divorce?

The answer is often yes.  Many clients have said that the best thing that happened during the divorce was that their spouse started dating, because it kept him/her more grounded and calm throughout the process.

At Broder & Orland LLC we often discuss the pros and cons and the possible outcomes and issues that a party, and more importantly, his/her child(ren) may face as a result of dating during the divorce process.

Common Law Marriage and Cohabitation Agreements in Connecticut

This Week’s Blog by Andy M. Eliot

Is Common Law Marriage Recognized in Connecticut?

No.  It is a common misconception that if unmarried couples reside together for a long enough period of time in Connecticut, a “Common Law” marriage is created, from which certain legal rights (such as alimony or property distribution rights) arise.  In fact, Common Law marriage is not recognized in Connecticut and, accordingly, no legal rights or consequences are accorded to unmarried couples who may reside together in a long-term romantic relationship.

Are there any Exceptions to the General Rule that Common Law Marriage is not Recognized in Connecticut?

There is one narrow exception to this general rule.  Generally, the validity of a marriage in Connecticut is determined by the law of the state in which the relationship was created.  Accordingly, if a couple established a Common Law marriage in a state that recognizes such relationships, the Common Law marriage that was established in the other state will be recognized in Connecticut.  The law of the state in which the common law marriage was claimed to have been contracted will determine the existence and validity of such a relationship.

May Unmarried Couples Enter into Binding Legal Agreements from Which Financial Rights and Obligations Arise?

Yes.  It is not uncommon for couples who are involved in a committed relationship, but who do not wish or intend to marry, to desire that certain financial rights and obligations that might otherwise only arise by way of marriage apply to them.  While cohabitation alone does not create any contractual relationship between cohabitating parties, or impose other legal duties upon such parties, in such scenarios the parties may enter into a written agreement, commonly referred to as a “Cohabitation Agreement.”

What is a Cohabitation Agreement?

A Cohabitation Agreement is a contract between unmarried cohabitants which allows the parties to contract to certain financial rights and obligations arising from their relationship, notwithstanding their intention to remain unmarried.  The state of Connecticut recognizes the legal validity of such agreements.  Typically, such agreements address rights and obligations pertaining to financial support (akin to alimony), or distribution of property in the event the relationship ends.

Are Cohabitation Agreements Enforceable in the same Manner as Divorce Agreements?

NoAlthough Cohabitation Agreements are recognized in Connecticut, financial disputes between unmarried cohabitants emanating from such agreements must be resolved by means outside the statutory scheme for dissolution of marriage.  Specifically, this means that Cohabitation Agreements must be considered under general contract principles.

At Broder & Orland LLC, we have experience drafting and negotiating Cohabitation Agreements for clients throughout Fairfield County and Connecticut.